This site uses cookies to help us provide quality services. Using our services, you consent to the use of cookies.

[NL] Helmplicht voor alle snorfietsers

Het tijdperk van helmloos rijden is voorbij! Mede met dank aan die pipo's op die opgevoerde tupperwarebakken. Anderzijds is een schedel niet echt bestand tegen een stoeprand of lantaarnpaal, al is het maar 25km/u.

disco-helm-helmplicht-voor-snorfietsers-2022
Saus: Natalina

Alle snorfietsers moeten vanaf 1 juli 2022 verplicht een helm dragen. De verwachting is dat hiermee het aantal verkeersdoden en –gewonden onder snorfietsers omlaag gaat. De ministerraad heeft er mee ingestemd dat minister Van Nieuwenhuizen van Infrastructuur en Waterstaat dit voorstel aan de Tweede Kamer zendt.

Dit betekent dat alle snorfietsers en passagiers dan net als alle bromfietsers een helm op moeten. Een snorfiets herken je aan een blauwe kentekenplaat, een bromfiets heeft een gele kentekenplaat.

Verschillende partijen en snorfietseigenaren hebben aangegeven een motorfietshelm te zwaar en te weinig ventilerend te vinden voor sommige soorten snorfietsen. Daarom heeft het ministerie van Infrastructuur en Waterstaat TNO laten kijken naar de veiligheid van een speed-pedelec-helm.

Als de uitkomsten van het onderzoek naar de veiligheid van een speed-pedelec-helm positief zijn dan is het voor snorfietsers dus mogelijk om niet alleen de bromfietshelm te kiezen, maar ook de speed-pedelec helm.

Naar verwachting zal de helmplicht 1 juli 2022 in werking treden. Zo heeft iedereen de tijd om een keuze te maken die past bij zijn of haar snorfiets.

 

Context: In the Netherlands you are allowed to ride a moper without a helmet as long as the speed is capped to 25km/h. Due to severe accidents caused by people making the mopeds run faster, therefore also behaving like a complete *sshole and the fact that a skull can also crack when a curb or laternposts hits it with 25km/h, the governmet decided to end these shennanigans and made wearing a helmet mandatory. (lovely run-away sentence, btw)

Dutch RAI news from April 1966!

Voor Nederlandstalige artikel, klik hier. (Origineel artikel)
For the article in English, click here.
Für den deutschsprachigen Artikel, klicken Sie hier.
Pour l'article français, cliquez ici.
Para ver el artículo en español, haga clic aquí.

Dutch RAI news from April 1966! (source: De Kampioen)

De Kampioen april 1966 Pagina 44 47 Page 1 De Kampioen april 1966 Pagina 44 47 Page 2
De Kampioen april 1966 Pagina 44 47 Page 3 De Kampioen april 1966 Pagina 44 47 Page 4

Moped
Always cycle with the wind behind you

We actually knew it already, but the mopeds on the RAl have clearly demonstrated it for the coming year: the preference of the Dutchman is increasingly going for the simple moped with automatic clutch; back to the bicycle with auxiliary motor.

Last year, the market share of this category increased from over 20% to 40%. Prices are between 400 and 450 guilders. And that's a good thing, because fifteen years ago, those prices were no lower, despite the increase in wages and production costs, and despite the recent increase in sales tax from 5 to 10%.

The Netherlands now has 1.6 million moped riders. They drive an average of 5000 km per year. Together they cover 7 billion kilometres a year, which is almost equal to the total passenger transport performance of Dutch Railways. It has also been established that 1 million moped riders use their vehicle to commute to work every day, so the economic importance of the moped is considerable.

Moreover, in our country with over one and a half million cars, its overcrowded road network and its oppressive urban traffic and parking problems, we could easily use a mode of transport for 1.6 million Dutch people that takes up little space on the roads and in the cities and does not demand a share of the cramped parking space.

Under these circumstances, the simple moped is clearly becoming popular again. This is thanks to the industry. The industry has focused its technical development on making it easier to operate the moped. The automatic transmission, which eliminates the need to change gear, has made the moped accessible to many; simplicity is also an important safety factor. The frame construction was based on this: sleek, functional and without excess of luxury. This made it possible to use really useful accessories, such as shopping baskets and child seats for ladies who combine shopping with picking up their school-aged children.

At the RAl they were lined up in large numbers. Batavus came up with its Datavette equipped with the ILO-Mini engine, which does not reach beyond 40 km/h and has not been tamed. At Berini, the EE is the most utilitarian moped with automatic clutch, DM is an Italian version of the simple automatic moped. Cimatti was born from the cooperation between Simplex, Locomotief and the firm Westor. Cyrus brings as part of a large series a simple model with Saxonnet engine. The Cristina comes from Italy and also has an automatic clutch. Stokvis presents next to its Puchs, Solexes and RAPs now also a Fair Lady, of course for ladies. Flandria (Avaros) hums in this row with a Eurolux. GareUino uses the Mosquito engine with automatic clutch. Gazelle, in cooperation with Casenave, took the ABG engine. Motom debuted its new Nova in a beautiful Italian frame. The Mobylette's we see in large numbers on our roads, especially the EEC, which now has a new and slightly more expensive model 40S with roller drive and of course also automatic clutch next to it. A Komar has come from Poland. Peugeot (in our country at Magneet) has its simplest model in three versions of about 400 to 500 guilders, regions in which almost all models end up, depending on the presence or absence of suspension. Solex, the pacesetter that has been around for 18 years and already used the automatic clutch a few years ago, also gave its 1966 model new features such as a shape, a rectangular headlight with better light distribution and a new throttle. Sparta's simplest model is now the Spartamatic, equipped with the ILO-Mini with automatic clutch. And Superia is aiming particularly at the young with its Super Twen, which has the simple Sachs engine with automatic clutch. Typhoon hopes to attract attention in this class with its models with front wheel suspension and possibly even plunger rear wheel suspension. More or less typical of this whole development is perhaps the Velo Mosquito (after so many years, that familiar roller-drive engine is back) with automatic clutch, a cruising speed of 35 km/h and a weight of no more than 29 kg, also with a carrier at the front and rear.

Heavier classifications

Some of the news in the "heavier classes" has already been covered in previous issues. Batavus brings, among others, a new Combi Sport with two gears. Gazelle has a Cornet with Sachs engine which is equipped with foot change and the Austrian KTM with ILO engine. Kaptein Moylette introduced electronic ignition on its motocross model (in case of flooding still a good spark) and now also has a new MobySport. Magneet hopes to bring its Magnematic, with Sachs 2-speed engine and automatic clutch, currently intended for export, to the domestic market soon; new here is also the four-speed model with foot change. The four-stroke exceptions include Demm, with its Special Lusso model, and Honda, which now has a new C 320 S model. Puch brought out its new Scramble even before the RAl, a moped for boys who like to ride off-road and who now have a three-speed engine at their disposal. Tomos, which as is well known had a certain affinity with Puch in the past, now has a new engine without forced cooling in two and three-speed versions. A well-known duo moped is still the Zündapp, which now has a new Sport Combinette, for which a fairing can be obtained at extra cost.

We see that also in this heavy class, automation is becoming more and more important. The fact that the speed of the moped is limited at 40 km/h has led to a favourable technical development of the small two- and four-stroke engines over the past few years. No race to more and more horsepower, but stabilisation in favour of longer life. Within this limitation, however, the opportunities for more rapid acceleration in the lower gear ratios have been taken advantage of, because acceleration can be somewhat easier with duo use.

We have only been able to mention the many news items here in brief. It is clear that the development of the mopeds is going in two directions. On the one hand, the simple moped with automatic control, which requires a minimum of maintenance and attention, but is intended for solo use. And on the other hand, the touring moped, with motorbikes equipped with two or more gears where, incidentally, automation has also made its appearance, and in bicycle parts which are strongly leaning in the direction of the ultra-light motorbike. In addition to Batavus and Eysink, there was now another Dutch moped manufacturer who actually realised this development: Cyrus introduced light motorbikes for the first time this year, in addition to its mopeds. So now we switch to the motorbikes.

Some of the news in the "heavier classes" has already been covered in previous issues. Batavus brings, among others, a new Combi Sport with two gears. Gazelle has a Cornet with Sachs engine which is equipped with foot change and the Austrian KTM with ILO engine. Kaptein Moylette introduced electronic ignition on its motocross model (in case of flooding still a good spark) and now also has a new MobySport. Magneet hopes to bring its Magnematic, with Sachs 2-speed engine and automatic clutch, currently intended for export, to the domestic market soon; new here is also the four-speed model with foot change. The four-stroke exceptions include Demm, with its Special Lusso model, and Honda, which now has a new C 320 S model. Puch brought out its new Scramble even before the RAl, a moped for boys who like to ride off-road and who now have a three-speed engine at their disposal. Tomos, which as is well known had a certain affinity with Puch in the past, now has a new engine without forced cooling in two and three-speed versions. A well-known duo moped is still the Zündapp, which now has a new Sport Combinette, for which a fairing can be obtained at extra cost.

We see that also in this heavy class, automation is becoming more and more important. The fact that the speed of the moped is limited at 40 km/h has led to a favourable technical development of the small two- and four-stroke engines over the past few years. No race to more and more horsepower, but stabilisation in favour of longer life. Within this limitation, however, the opportunities for more rapid acceleration in the lower gear ratios have been taken advantage of, because acceleration can be somewhat easier with duo use.

The heaviest bikes at the RAl were the 750cc twins from AMC (Matchless, A.J.S. and Norton), but the largest number of entries came from the light class between 50 and 100cc, in which the Dutch motorbike industry, after years, hopes to play a role again with apparent zeal. Between the two categories is the Japanese armada with Honda, Yamaha and Suzuki.

Quietly, BMW was on a large stand with no news other than the quarter-litre R 27, which, as they say, returns at the request of customers. The list of the light class now includes the names of Batavus, Cyrus; Magneet, DKW, Eysink, Honda, ltal, Kreidler, HercuÏes, Motom, Puch, Suzuki, Garelli, Yamaha and Zündapp.

The British motor industry had its own pavilion, a place where the real motorcyclist could not find all the good memories, however, which one might have expected. Norton was there, imposing but expensive. B.S.A. showed its three 650 cc models Thunderbolt Startwin, Lightning Startwin, and Spitfire Mk li Startwin, the latter with its 55 hp engine reaching a speed of 200 km per hour. One bike that really stands out is the Velocette Thruxton for the keen biker with a taste for British machines and their specific qualities. Triumph was present with its range from the 200cc single-cylinder OHV to the 650cc twin Bonneville. The British motorbike industry is still doing very interesting business with the United States, where the motorbike is growing in popularity. Specially for the U.S.A. are for example the 650 and 750 cc twins of A.M.C.

The news at Honda started with the 50 cc CB 50S, a lively OHV with five gears, then the 450 cc OHV with overhead dual camshaft, which has an output of 43 HP/8500 rpm, is equipped with an electric starter and, according to the manufacturer, can reach a top speed of 180 km per hour. The Japanese are also targeting the American market with this model.

Suzuki's news includes, in addition to an 80cc motorbike, the six-speed quarter-litre two-cylinder Super Sport, which produces 29bhp/7500rpm and features the Posi Force lubrication system where the oil pump directly connected to the crankshaft is controlled by the throttle, so that the lubrication is adjusted according to the load of the engine. A nice detail, simple yet typical of the thoughtful workmanship, is the transparent plastic tube on the outside of the tank, which indicates the contents of the tank as a communicating vessel. (2795.-) Yamaha brings a new 305 cc two-cylinder, five-speed, 29 hp/7000 rpm two-stroke with autotube injection, where oil and petrol are administered separately. Also new is the 100 cc two-cylinder two-stroke, also with autolube; this little engine, with two carburettors, has a power of 9.5 hp/8500 rpm. Finally, among the Japanese, there is the 500 cc two-cylinder Lilac R92, whose instructors must have been watching a BMW.

Dutch motorcycling news for the first time this year comes from Cyrus, which introduces three models with Sachs engines, the 5.4 HP Royal 50 with 5 gears, the 6.3 HP Royal 75 with 5 gears and the 8.2 HP Royal 100 with 4 gears. It is an initiative that gives courage to the motorcycling public, because it is becoming so quiet around us. Another Dutchman, who never gives up, is Eysink with its 50 cc models with the special suspension that Eysink had already introduced, whereby a shock absorber takes the place of the front vertical frame tube from steering head to engine block.

The long-awaited four-cylinder from M.V. Agusta did not arrive, but a new 125cc single did. Jawa now has an automatic clutch on its 250cc and 350cc models, with the clutch lever retained purely for use in special circumstances such as pulling up from a standstill on a steep mountain road. Of the 125cc CZ, the low price, f 999, may now be mentioned as very noteworthy among all the four-digit figures. Ducati presented a 160cc four-speed OHV, the Monza Junior. The connection from the heavy moped to the ultra-light moped is there and the prices are not that different. It is to be hoped that younger moped riders will see this development.

pdf De Kampioen - April 1966 (1.44 MB)

New Anime based around the Honda Super Cub

FIRST OF ALL; I know I am way behind in answering emails. I have really ran out of energy, unfortunately and I will pick up the slack soon again.

Now for the Anime:

Oguma, a reserved second-year high school student, has nothing—no parents, hobbies, friends, or goals. On her way home one afternoon, she visits a vehicle shop in hopes of acquiring a motor scooter. With only enough money to make ends meet, she is disheartened by the price tags and prepares to turn back. However, as she is about to leave, the shop's owner offers her a pre-owned Honda Super Cub for ten thousand yen. Believing that the motorcycle will help brighten her monotonous world, she accepts the deal. As Koguma journeys through her town on small adventures with her Super Cub, she begins to build irreplaceable friendships and eagerly advances toward her new life.

Source: https://myanimelist.net/anime/40685/Super_Cub

Excerpt from "Stolen"

Excerpt from "Stolen", an old publication to identify various brands of motorcycles.

Honda Motorcycles

Honda Motorcycles are manufactured in Japan. The only distributor for the United States is the American Honda Motor Company Inc., Gardena, California. This agency maintains records of all motorcycles imported into the United States. In most instances, assembly information is available from American Honda by submitting either the frame or engine number. The National Automobile Theft Bureau can provide information only by frame number.

Honda is by far the largest selling motorcycle in the country today. Consequently, more Hondas are stolen than are any other motorcycle.

Replacement frames do not have frame numbers assigned or stamped thereon. Complete replacement engines do have factory assigned and stamped numbers. This is done primarily for warranty purposes, Honda motorcycles are generally registered in most jurisdictions by the frame number. In the past, numerous Hondas have been registered by an incomplete frame number, (model number has been omitted) an engine number, or an incomplete engine number. All Honda engine numbers have an "E" stamped after the model designation prefix. Honda frame numbers do not contain the letter "E"' which is an engine number designator. It should be noted however, that Honda models CA102, CM91, CA105T, CL125, SS125, PC5OY, SS65, and C100R may all have an alpha designator in the frame number.

These are the only known exceptions in Hondas imported into the United
States.

A. Alteration of Honda Identifying Numbers

  1. A Honda engine number is one of the most difficult to alter without detection. The single cylinder engines have a recessed area into which the engine number is stamped. Surrounding this recessed area is a raised border. The larger two-cylinder engines have a distinctive engine number that is stamped into a raised, knurled area which is surrounded by a raised lip. Any attempt to alter this number would necessitate the removal of the knurled surface and probably disturb the surrounding lip, thus making the alteration apparent to even the untrained eye.
  2. Honda frame numbers are frequently removed entirely or altered. Grind marks, uneven and irregular surface, evidence of welding, unusually heavy paint, or unevenly stamped letters and numbers are indications of alteration. If the engine number appears unaltered and the frame number appears to have been altered, compare the two. They should be similar in size and style. Several of the Honda numbers are distinctive and difficult to duplicate, The numbers "9" and "4" are probably the most distinctive. Once these authentic numbers are seen, imitations immediately become readily apparent. You are encouraged to make yourself familiar with them.

B. Data pertaining to Honda frame and engine numbers.

  1. There are two types of frames, pressed and tubular. Pressed frames are used for models S-65, S-90, CT-90, CT200, CM91, CA95, CA72, CA100, CA102, C110, and CA200. All other models, (the larger models), use the tubular frame.
  2. The chart below lists the various models and number of digits used.

    MODEL NUMBER OF DIGITS
    CA-100 1 letter and 6 digits
    CA-102 1 letter and 6 digits
    CA-105 1 letter and 6 digits
    C-110 6 digits beginning with 3 or 4
    C-200 6 digits beginning with 1 or 2 or
      7 digits beginning with 3
    CT-200 6 digits beginning with 1
    S-65 1 or 2 letters and 6 digits
    S-90 6 digits beginning with 1 or 5
    CM-91 1 letter (A) and 6 digits beginning with ?
    CT-90 6 digits beginning with 1
    CA-95 6 digits beginning with 1 or 3 or
      7 digits beginning with 4 or 5
    CB-160 7 digits be~inning with 1 or 9
    CL-160 7 digits be~inning with 1
    CA-72 6 digits beginning with 1, 3, or 4 or
      7 digits beginning with 1
    CB-72 6 digits beginning with 3 or 4 or
      7 digits beginning with 1
    CL-72 6 digits beginning with 3 or
      7 digits beginning with 1 or 4
    CA-77 6 digits beginning with 1, 3, or 4 or
      7 digits beginning with 1
    CB-77 6 digits beginning with 1, 3, or 4 or
      7 digits beginning with 1
    CL-77 7 digits begi'nning with 1
    CB-450 7 digits beginning with 1
       
    EXAMPLES: CL160-1010823
      CA77-302251
      CB450-1000432

0102

0304

Latest Books/Magazines/Publications